PROCESS

STUDENT ATHLETE
PATH TO PLAYING IN COLLEGE

Focus on academics

Just like the term “student Athlete”, the word student precedes the athletic potential for any high school student. The first year is just as important as the last. This is a year of transition and a huge learning experience for young student athletes to understand time management. It is key to find the time for homework, studying and at the same time dedicate to your sport.

Establish your presences

Before any young athlete looks ahead at playing at the next level, they must first find success at the high school level. Athletes need to understand being coachable, committed and displaying their work ethic is key this year. It will build trust and reliability. Key elements which your high school Coaches will communicate to College Coaches as part of your potential and character.

Off Season

Before any young athlete looks ahead at playing at the next level, they must first find success at the high school level. Athletes need to understand being coachable, committed and displaying their work ethic is key this year. It will build trust and reliability. Key elements which your high school Coaches will communicate to College Coaches as part of your potential and character.

Continue focusing on academics

Students may typically take the practice SAT or practice ACT during your sophomore year. These scores can be used as an early indication of where you are currently testing at. Colleges will request your core Grade Point Average (GPA). This includes all required core classes like math, science, English, social studies, and foreign language classes. Any classes with a low grade or fail will be accounted for in your transcripts. Students may remediate a class during the regular school year if there is space available. If a student is remediating a D, they will not earn additional credits. The previous grade will remain on the transcript; however, the new grade will be computed in your GPA.

Take advantage of school resources

Guidance counselors and coaches can provide valuable advice both on the field and off, making them excellent – and free – resources to harness. Counselors can help students make sure they’re taking core classes required by the NCAA while coaches can ensure their game is where it needs to be to garner attention from college recruiters.

Start a list

It’s never too early to start identifying prospective schools and categorizing them by level of play, academic programs and other important factors. Students should also study the current roster of student athletes in their sport to see how they measure up and where improvements can be made.

Academics, Yes

If you haven’t noticed yet, academics are crucially important to the success of any student athlete. Junior year is the time when many students take their official SAT and ACT and submit their scores and GPAs to the NCAA Eligibility Center to determine if they’re qualified to play, so every point matters.

Take advantage of all opportunities

Junior year is the most important in terms of recruiting, so any chance to be on an off-season team, attend a showcase/camp event, take part in a clinic or participate in training opportunities should be accepted; both so athletes can work on sharpening their craft of play and meet influential people in the world of collegiate sports.

Gather and share footage

One of the most effective ways of being noticed by coaches is having an excellent highlight reel of plays. The film should be a compilation of the athlete’s best plays, with spot shadows or arrows used to ensure coaches can easily identify the student. Coaches typically film high school games to review plays, so students should work with them to access footage and select the appropriate segments. In addition to posting the video online, students should ensure their contact information, jersey number, measurements and PRs or sports-specific stats are also included.

Prepare for recruitment

Coaches will come watch athletes play, so it’s important to get as much time on the stage of your sport as possible in as many arenas as possible. College Coaches are allowed to communicate with prospective student athletes beginning in their junior year, while some sports also allow limited phone calls. It’s vital for students to respond to College Coaches in a timely manner and to pay close attention to how a Coach is communicating with you.

This is it

It’s the last push toward finishing strong with a high GPA, excellent AP scores and impressive standardized test scores. These numbers will greatly impact the amount of financial aid a student receives, so it’s incredibly important to remain vigilant until the last test is taken and the final paper is turned in.

Perform to your maximum potential

Be it a high school game, travel team, showcase, outside league or special tournament, students should be giving it their all and working closely with high school coaches to iron out any issues in their game. Outside of dead periods, coaches are now allowed to call prospective student athletes once per week, although students are allowed as many times as they wish. Still, students shouldn’t take that as a sign to speak with as many coaches as humanly possible, but rather to hone in on their top choices and express serious interest.

Your decision and Research signing dates

After years of hard work and dedication to be the best version of themselves as both an academic and an athlete, students who have risen to the occasion now have the joy of selecting the institution that will continue shaping and growing them for the next four years. Each sport has a different signing date for the National Letter of Intent, so students need to research these and keep them in mind as they’re making final decisions about where they want to play.

Visit as many schools as possible

During every summer, holiday, spring or fall break, long weekend, or family vacation between sophomore and senior year, students should try to visit as many schools as possible. Before setting off, prospective student athletes should make a list of the most important qualities of a school or athletic department to measure how each stacks up to their needs and wants. Most visits prior to senior year will be unofficial – meaning students and families are responsible for paying expenses – but they may provide free tickets to a game as a prospect. Seniors are limited to accepting only five official visits; those paid for by the school, so you must choose wisely and pick only those you are seriously considering.